New York

tom@americantom.com

 

The crown. The mark of royalty. This symbol denotes a tavern with an overall excellence that exceeds the norm.

 The foamy mug marks a specific  feature that is noteworthy.

Normally when a bar goes out of business the location will never again house a tavern. Often the liquor license is sold to a distant entity.  The phoenix marks pubs that have defied the odds and reopened after having been silenced.

Not every pub that says its Irish is Irish but the ones that are and the ones that have great St Patrick's Day events will be identified with this brand.

The screw. The sign of gross injustice or disservice.  AmericanTom believes that people go to their local watering hole to escape their day to day grind and troubles.  In a way, servers and barkeeps are like actors - orchestrating a great play whose cast are their customers. Some of the things that can generate a screw are: great disparity between how regulars and visitors are treated, rudeness or utter incompetence.

Most businesses have a neutral attitude toward motorcyclists.   The HD logo marks taverns that openly welcome those who arrive on scooters.

Inflation sucks. It sucks away your buying power.  If you can still buy a beer for one dollar - you will see this sign.

Seafood is a class of food all by itself.  Clams have little competition - few foods are better when done well and few foods can cause more problems when improperly served. See the clam next to a bar's name and it shows where tasty clams have been enjoyed!

I like Reading, PA. In spite of being Pennsylvania's most dangerous city there are a lot of cool things to do here. One of the best is that "our" beer is back. You can have your big, national (and often foreign-owned) brands.        I  am happy that Old Gus has come home!  Taverns serving this delicious brew will have this icon.

Have a cold one on the deck!

BROOKLYN BREWERY
79 East 11th Street   Brooklyn   NY   11211    718-486-7422

www.brooklynbrewery.com

           

   

2: Very cool looking building     4: This cat was roaming around and seemed to really dig all the attention it received    5. People waiting for a tour    6: The bar in the warehouse  

<6-1007> I have always had a mental image of "New York City" as a place of incredible hustle and bustle, noise, crime and dirt.  It took me over 30 years before I got to apply my perception to reality.

Although I have only been to NYC a few times, each trip has presented me with the chance to discover something new and interesting.

This weekend I stayed in Brooklyn and made two discoveries.  The first was the amazing Prison Ship Martyrs Monument - a memorial to the 11,000+ patriots and prisoners who suffered, and often died, on British prison ships during the Revolutionary War.  Knowing that many of their remains were buried within the Fort Greene Park memorial caused me to feel a deep sense of reverence for their sacrifice.

The second, and much lighter toned, discovery was the Brooklyn Brewery

One hundred years ago there were over 48 breweries in Brooklyn.  In 1976 the last one closed shop and it took 10 years before this brewery opened.

I walked up 11th street to find the brick building's large side door open and welcoming me in.  I was met by the gift shop girl who greeted me warmly and was happy to sell me the $3 tokens that could be exchanged for beers in their warehouse tavern.

My lager was even better than the good bottled version I had enjoyed the night before.  Bartender Tiara was knowledgeable about the numerous beers they had tapped and suggested I try the Brooklyn Pennant ale.  Generally, I don't prefer pale ales but this one was very good.

This company has a great location, fantastic website, great beers and really decent souvenirs (typed as I am wearing my new BB green t-shirt).

Brooklyn Brewery proclaims itself as one of America's top 40 breweries and that very well may be true. I definitely want to return and sample more of their products.

 

KEVIN BARRY'S
56 Willoughby Street   Brooklyn, NY   11201   

 

<6-1007> I "found" this bar just a few blocks from where I was staying in Brooklyn.  It looked very promising with a shamrock on its sign.

I opened the door and was stopped by a guy who asked for my "card".  I pulled out ID but was told he needed to see my "KB Card".  I replied I just wanted to get a beer.  Without a "KB Card" (whatever that is) I had to use the main entrance.

The primary entrance displayed none of the Irish look that the back one did so I decided to pass.  I didn't have time to read the list of one zillion prohibitions that would keep you from gaining entry.  I am a simple guy - just wanting to have a beer and check out a new tavern. Maybe next time I will be more willing to play games to get a drink.